Weekly Photo Challenge: Depth

This week’s challenge from The Daily Post was to share our take on “depth”.  The first image that popped into my head was an image close to home, from the Kondalilla National Park, in my home state of Queensland.  The park is famous for it’s spectacular series of waterfalls – aptly named the Kondalilla Falls – which drop over 100meters into the rainforest valley below.    Kondalilla Falls are located in the Sunshine Coast hinterland, approximately 60mins North of Brisbane.   To reach the base of the falls is a fairly easy 2-3 hour circuit but the payoff is a pretty spectacular view of the rushing water cascading down almost 100 meters from the rock-face above.

From the base of the amazing Kondalilla Falls, Queensland, Australia

From the base of the amazing Kondalilla Falls, Queensland, Australia

The next image that jumped to mind was the spectacular – famous and cliché – image from Santorini in Greece. Those stunning views of the Aegean Sea juxtaposed with the houses and cities clinging to the cliffs edge.  The deep azure blue of the sky and the even deeper ocean below is a stark contrast to the white and neutral colours of the houses above.  Photo credit in this image goes to my lovely wife, she took this image back in 2003 on her first ever overseas holiday and I am still questioning why I ever let her go without me! Back then I couldn’t see the attraction of travelling – boy how I would work hard to reverse that opinion!

The deep azure skies above Santorini, contrasting the stark white and neutral colour pallet of the houses adorning the coastlines.

The deep azure skies above Santorini, contrasting the stark white and neutral colour pallet of the houses adorning the coastlines.

And lastly can we go past the real example of depth – the Parkes Radio Telescope.  Again another somewhat local attraction being located in central New South Wales, just outside the town of Parkes.  The Parkes telescope is regarded as one of the world’s leading radio telescopes.  Famously the Parkes telescope was the very dish that received the signal from the Apollo 11 Moon Landing and relayed those now famous images around the world.  The telescope measures over 64meteres in diameter and sits atop a 10meter concrete tower.  It is an amazing piece of hardware and helps scientists from around the globe to probe the deepest darkest parts of our solar system and beyond….

Deep Space - it doesn't get much deeper than the Parkes Radio Telescope.

Deep Space – it doesn’t get much deeper than the Parkes Radio Telescope.


So that’s what I think about when I think about Depth – what about you?  Feel free to share you blogs in the comments below and let me see what you identify when you think about depth.

 

To learn more about the Parkes Radio Telescope – check out the CSIRO Website for the telescope.

 

 

 

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